706-779-3046
Granite  

Source: Marble Institute of America


To get the longest life and preserve
the beauty of
your natural stone, follow these
simple tips:

Coasters
Use coasters under all glasses, particularly those
containing alcohol or citrus juices.

Trivets
: While many stones can withstand heat, the use of
trivets or mats is recommended.

Dust Mopping
Dust mop interior floors frequently using a clean
non-treated dry dust mop. Sand, dirt and grit are
abrasive and can damage natural stone.

Mats/rugs
Mats or area rugs inside and outside an entrance
will help to minimize the sand, dirt and grit that
may
scratch the stone floor. Be sure that the underside
of the mat or rug is a slip resistant surface.

Vacuum cleaners
If used, be sure the metal or plastic attachments or
the wheels are not worn as they can scratch the
surface of some stones.

Spills
Blot the spill with a paper towel immediately. Don’t
wipe the area, it will spread the spill. Flush the
area
with water and mild soap and rinse several times.
Dry the area thoroughly with a soft cloth. Repeat
as
necessary.

Cleaning
Clean stone surfaces with a neutral cleaner, stone
soap, or a mild liquid dishwashing detergent and
warm water.
Similar to any item cleaned in your home, an
excessive concentration of cleaner or soap may
leave a film and cause streaks. Follow
manufacturer recommendations.
Use a clean rag mop on floors and a soft cloth for
other surfaces for best results.
Rinse the surface thoroughly after washing with
the
soap solution and dry with a soft cloth.
Change the rinse water frequently.
In the bath or other wet areas, soap scum can be
minimized by using a squeegee after each use. To
remove soap scum, use a non-acidic soap scum
remover or a solution of ammonia and water
(about
1/2 cup ammonia to a gallon of water). Frequent
or
over-use of an ammonia solution may eventually
dull the surface of some stone types.
In outdoor pool, patio or hot tub areas, flush with
clear water and use mild bleach solution to remove
algae or moss.

Cleaning Products
Many suppliers offer products used for stone
cleaning.
Products containing lemon, vinegar or other acids
may dull or etch calcareous stones.
Scouring powders or creams often contain
abrasives that may scratch certain stones.
Many commercially available rust removers
(laundry rust stain removers, toilet bowl cleaners)
contain trace levels of hydrofluoric acid (HF). This
acid attacks silicates in addition to other minerals.
All stones, including granite and quartzite, will be
attacked if exposed to HF.
Do not mix ammonia and bleach. This combination
creates a toxic and lethal gas.

Sealing
Sealing is a common step taken on some stones as
an extra precaution against staining. In fact, the
sealing products used in the stone industry are
‘impregnators” which do not actually seal the
stone,
but more correctly act as a repellent rather than a
sealer. Sealing does not make the stone stain
proof,
rather it makes the stone more stain resistant.
When consulting with your stone supplier, you may
find that many stones do not require sealing.
However, applying an impregnating sealer is a
common practice.

When considering sealing, remember that sealing
the stone does not
If a sealer is applied in a food preparation area, be
sure that it is non-toxic and safe for use.

Consult with your supplier or sealing manufacturer
specific to the type of sealer and frequency of use
recommended.

Stain Identification Tips
Identifying the type of stain on the stone surface is
the key to removing it. Stains can be oil based,
organic, metallic, biological, ink based, paint based,
acid based. If you don’t know what caused the
stain, consider likely staining agents that may have
been present. Here are some questions you
consider:

Where is the Stain Located?
Is it near a plant, a food service area, an area
where cosmetics are used?
What color is it?
What is the shape or pattern?
What occurs in the area around the stain?

Stain Removal Steps
Surface stains can often be removed by cleaning
with an appropriate cleaning product or household
chemical.

What Type of Stain is It?
The following sections describe the types of stains
you may have to deal with and the appropriate
household chemicals to use and how to prepare
and
apply a poultice to remove the stain.

Oil-based
(grease, plumbers’ putty, tar, cooking oil, milk,
cosmetics)
An oil-based stain will darken the stone and
normally must be chemically dissolved so the
source of the stain can be flushed or rinsed away.
Clean gently with a soft, liquid cleanser with one of
the following: household detergent, mineral spirits,
or acetone.

Organic
(coffee, tea, wine, fruit, tobacco, paper, food,
urine,
leaves, bark, bird droppings)
May cause a pinkish-brown stain and may
disappear after the source of the stain has been
removed. Outdoors, with the sources removed, sun
and rain action will generally bleach out the stains.
Indoors, clean with 12% hydrogen peroxide (hair
bleaching strength) and a few drops of ammonia.

Metal
(iron, rust, copper, bronze)
Iron or rust stains are orange to brown in color and
follow the shape of the staining object such as
nails,
bolts, screws, cans, flower pots, metal furniture.
Copper and bronze stains appear as green or
muddy-brown and result from the action of
moisture on nearby or embedded bronze, copper or
brass items. Metal stains must be removed with a
poultice. (See website on Using a Poultice –
www.marble-institute.com/consumers/poultices.
cfm. Deep-seated, rustystains are extremely
difficult to remove and the stone may be
permanently stained.

Biological
(algae, mildew, lichens, moss, fungi)
Clean with diluted cleaning solution. Use a 1/2 cup
of any of the following: ammonia, bleach, or
hydrogen peroxide and a gallon of water.
Reminder:
do not mix bleach and ammonia.

Ink
(magic marker, pen, ink)
On light colored stones, clean with bleach or
hydrogen peroxide. On dark colored stones, clean
with lacquer thinner or acetone.

Paint
Small amounts can be removed with lacquer
thinner
or scraped off carefully with a razor blade. Heavy
paint coverage should be removed only with a
commercial “heavy liquid” paint stripper available
from hardware stores and paint centers. These
strippers normally contain caustic soda or lye. Do
not use acids or flame tools to strip paint from
stone. Paint strippers can etch the surface of the
stone; repolishing may be necessary. Follow the
manufacturer’s directions for use of these
products,
and flush the area thoroughly with clean water.
Protect yourself with rubber gloves and eye
protection, and work in a well-ventilated area. Use
only wood or plastic scrapers for removing the
sludge and curdled paint. Normally, latex and
acrylic paints will not cause staining. Oil-based
paints, linseed oil, putty, caulks and sealants may
cause oily stains. Refer to the section on oil-based
stains.

Water Spots and Rings
(surface accumulation of hard water)
Buff with dry 0000 steel wool.

Fire and Smoke Damage
Older stones and smoke or firestained
fireplaces
may require a thorough cleaning. When
the smoke
is removed, there may also be some
etching (due to
carbonic & other acids in smoke).
Commercially
available “smoke removers” may save time
and
effort.

Etch Marks
(caused by acids left on the surface of the stone)
Some materials will etch the finish but not leave a
stain. Others will both etch and stain. Contact your
stone dealer or call a professional stone restorer
for refinishing or repolishing etched areas.

Efflorescence
(a white powder that may appear on the surface of
the stone)
It is caused by the deposition of mineral salts
carried by water from below the surface of the
stone. When the water evaporates, it leaves the
powdery substance. If the installation is new, dust
mop or vacuum the powder. You may have to do
this several times as the stone dries out. Do not
use
water to remove the powder; it will only
temporarily disappear. If the problem persists,
contact your installer to help identify and remove
the cause of the moisture.

Scratches and Nicks
Slight surface scratches may be buffed with dry
0000 steel wool. Deeper scratches and nicks in the
surface of the stone should be repaired and
repolished by a professional.
Source: LG Hausys

ECO-CONSCIOUS
From our manufacturing techniques to the final
product itself, at LG Hausys, sustainability is at the
core of everything we do. In fact, our HI-MACS Eden
Plus Surfaces are made from up to 35% certified pre-
consumer recycled material, making them one of the
most environmentally conscious acrylic surfaces
available. Click here for more information about Our
Green Story.

HYGENIC
Unlike many surfaces, HI-MACS is nonporous, which
means it doesn't have crevices or surface
irregularities where harmful bacteria and mold can
grow.
Scratch-Resistant
Because of its superior durability, HI-MACS stands up
to most light scratches. Should you accidentally inflict
a deeper scratch or surface impression, a trained
professional can easily resurface your HI-MACS
thanks to its sealant-free consistency.
Stain-Resistant
HI-MACS was designed to endure and shine in the face
of virtually all common daily wear, including some of
the most relentless stains.
Low Maintenance
Your HI-MACS Solid Surface requires nothing beyond
normal cleaning with soap and water to ensure that it
retains its superior beauty and functionality for many
years to come.

EASY TO CLEAN
Some surfaces require special solvents and cleaner to
maintain their luster and integrity ¬¬¬— not HI-MACS.
Simple mild soap and water applied to a damp cloth is
all you need to keep your HI-MACS surface looking
great.

HEAT-RESISTANT
HI-MACS withstands temperatures up to an impressive
225 degrees Fahrenheit. Daily use will not cause any
burning or scorching, however, it should be noted that
prolonged exposure to extreme heat could cause
discoloration.

Self-Sealing
Many surfaces require a regular reapplication of
sealants and/or waxes to keep natural pits and cracks
filled and to maintain hygienic properties. HI-MACS is
nonporous, and requires nothing other than light
cleaning with soap and water to maintain its brilliance
and anti-microbial smoothness.

Color Options
HI-MACS offers you an incredible array of unique
possibilities with a dazzling palette of 110 colors and
finishes, plus our exclusive color-matching technology.
Click here to see the full product line.
15-year Transferable Warranty
At LG Hausys, we fully stand behind our HI-MACS
Solid Surface, which is why we proudly offer a 15-
year fully transferrable warranty. Click here to
complete the Warranty Registration.

Affordable Luxury
HI-MACS exudes an undeniable sense of quality, one
that is further enhanced by the product's unlimited
thermo-formability and enormous range of color
options. However, HI-MACS delivers this level of
superiority and beauty with a price tag that won't
break your budget.

MADE IN THE USA
Our state-of-the-art production facilities in Adairsville,
Georgia, produce both HI-MACS and Viatera surfaces
for North America. By keeping our manufacturing
efforts near our end consumers, we lessen the
distance our products need to ship, thereby reducing
pollution and fuel consumption